Recent Deaths: Helen Stuart Campbell. As a writer, she was the author of books on varied subjects.

Helen Stuart Campbell, social reformer, author of numerous books on women and child labor and many juvenile stories, a lecturer and traveler, died on Monday at her home in Dedham in her eightieth year. She was known throughout the United States as one of the pioneers in the fight to gain legislation bettering working conditions for women and children.
Born in Lockport, N.Y., on July 4, 1839, she was the daughter of Homer H. Stuart, a lawyer. She was educated in the schools of Warren, R.I. She began her career as a writer of juvenile stories, many of which appeared in St. Nicholas and other magazines of similar type. Her Ainslee series was specially well known. Taking up the problems of philanthropy and social reform she wrote on these subjects the books: "Prisoners of Poverty." Prisoners of Poverty Abroad," "Passages in the Practice of Dr. Martha Scarborough," "Women Wage Earners," "Problems of he Poor," "Darkness and Daylight in New York," and others.
For a time Mrs.Campbell was a special lecturer on sociological themes in the University of Wisconsin. She was a professor in the State Agricultural College of Kansas from 1895 to 1899. She was the author of several books on domestic economy and wrote "Household Economics," also the biographical work "Ann Bradstreet and her Times." Some of her other books, in addition to those named, have been: "Six sinners," "The Easiest Way in Housekeeping and Cooking," His Grandmothers," "Under Green Apple Boughs," "The What-to-Do Club," "Mrs. Herndon's Income," "Miss Melinda's Opportunity," "Roger Berkeley's Probation," "In Foreign Kitchens"and "Ballantyne" a novel. She was married in 1860. No near relatives survive Mrs. Campbell (Boston Evening Transcript, Tuesday July 23, 1918, pg. 10).

Helen S. Campbell Died Monday at Her Dedham Home. Pioneer and great student in sociological work for women and children.
The author of numerous books on philanthropy and social reform - University lecturer on Domestic science - Her life work has left a lasting impress on social conditions of women and children of her day - Funeral Thursday.
Helen Stuart Campbell, educator, social reformer, lecturer, traveller, and author died at her home in Dedham, July 22, 1918. She was the daughter of Homer H. Stuart and was bron in Lockport, N.Y., July 4, 1839.
Mrs. Campbell was educated in the schools of her native city, and in the Gammel School, Warren, R.I. She was a deep student of Sociology nd was known thruout the United States as one of the pioneers in the fight to secure legislation bettering working conditions for women and children.
Mrs. Campbell began her career as a writer of juvenile stories, many of which appared in St. Nicholas. Her Ainslee series was specially well known. Taking up the problems of philanthropy and social reform, she wrote much on these subjects and produced the following books: "Problems of the Poor," "Darkness and Daylight in New York," "Prisoners of Poverty," "Women Wage Earners," Passages in the Practice of Dr. Martha Scarborough" and"Prisoners of Poverty Abroad."
In addition to the above volumes she wrote several books on domestic economy. "Ann Bradstreet and Her Times," "Six Sinners," "His Grandmothers," "In Foreign Kitchens," "The What-to-Do club," "The Easiest Way in Housekeeping and Cooking," "Ballantyne," "Household Economics," "Under Green Apple Boughs," "Miss Melinda's Opportunity," "Mrs. Herndon's Income" and "Roger Berkeley's Probation."
For a time Mrs. Campbell was a special lecturer on sociological themes in the University of Wisconsin and from 1895 to 1899 she was a professor in the State Agricultural College of Kansas. She also travelled extensively acquiring a culture and refinement which made her a most delightful companion, welcome in any social atmosphere.
No near relatives survive her. Funeral services were held in the Bulfinch Place Church, Boston, Thursday noon. (The Dedham Transcript, July 27, 1918).